"Money was maliciously introduced in ancient times as a tool of enslavement" -
Michael Tellinger

"The present belongs to the future and future generations, and all old laws, religious and other, should be abrogated immediately. Free us!" - Vinay Gupta on Twitter

"You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete." - R. Buckminster Fuller

"You find the strangest ways to be positive!" - Diane Duane, Wizards Abroad

Friday, July 19, 2013

my favorite news


A quick post about my currently favorite podcasters. If this kind of thing interests you and you aren't familiar with the ones listed here, give them a try. They're all good sources of news and various points of view that you just won't see in the usual sources. How often do you hear discussion in "the media" about Mondragon and other alternate economies; deep science of climate change; nature of consciousness; the coup that ate America; and just about everything else of real importance? Another reason I'm doing this post is that a lot of my news links in the sidebar have become broken and need to be fixed - when I can get to it - but these links are current. So - a shout-out for:

Radio Ecoshock - Not just the fine podcast, with its commentary and interviews, but the links! - the impassioned Alex Smith provides a great source of information on climate change and other realities, and pulls no punches. "Alarmist"? to some, maybe--but only if they haven't been paying attention, have been taken in by corporate propaganda, or are still in denial. Whether the topic is tipping points or things to live for, this is a blogger I always look forward to.

Background Briefing with Ian Masters - consistently interesting. Sometimes I find myself objecting to a narrow or misleading perspective while at other times, I'm shouting "YES!" ... Followed regularly, this can be valuable for the variety of current news topics covered, and to see what is being said about them by a wide range of professional types.

Legalise Freedom - Good collection of material on culture, from the UK. Topics ranging from the Dark Mountain Project to the history of remote viewing offer fascinating stuff, delivered with style.

illo for episode 63, Next U.S. Revolution
The Extraenvironmentalist - Anything goes, with this pair of young podcasters from northern Cascadia. Most recently (at left), coverage of alternative economic systems -- co-ops, Mondagon, what's happening in Cleveland. Great guests, real news, entertaining listening. With only very rare exceptions (in fact only one comes immediately to mind), they choose their guests well.

The Lifeboat Hour: If you saw the documentary film Collapse and found it impossible to look away, you'll be equally fascinated by Michael Ruppert's weekly broadcast from the Nightclub at the End of the World, and the news of where this fine now-retired journalist is this week, and where's he's going next week--as well, of course, as his informed and concerned take on what's behind the news. Bracing, courageous, loopy... I never miss it. (UPDATE: Mike Ruppert is no longer with us. The story and circumstances of his suicide have been sadly misunderstood by too many people but if you listened to his podcast for very long, you probably understood the roller coaster he was living. His podcast continues, at his request, under the leadership of Carolyn Baker.)

C-Realm: C stands for consciousness, and that's what's covered here, in what seems like every possible way. Fascinating stuff to delve into, from podcaster KMO.

Unwelcome Guests:  "Two hours of intelligent talk radio" hardly begins to describe this. Check out the topics.

For nuclear news: My most reliable news source has to be Fairewinds with Arne Gundersen (podcast and blog). That, and this: http://enenews.com/ which collects stories from all over, but rarely the corporate media. Also, I miss Dr. Helen Caldicott's podcasts, If You Love This Planet; she's no longer doing them but if you missed them, check out the archives linked above.

Archdruid Report: Not a podcast, but this is one blogger I never miss. Because I find it hard to read anything very long on the computer screen, I go to the trouble of transferring his posts to my Kindle to take my time over them. He handles very large context, weaving science, history, philosophy, and other usually fragmented disciplines with clarity in an unfolding examination of reality. Always fascinating. One great essay a week - plus chapters in an ongoing science fiction novel, too (Star's Reach).

Nature Bats Last: Another blogger I have a special regard for is Guy McPherson, who truly walks the walk and has gathered quite a following for his courageous personal integrity. He thinks we're in for NTE (near-term extinction) yet somehow I don't find that view depressing--maybe because he's not depressed. (Anyway, if the human race is ending, my only regret is that we didn't accomplish it sooner, before we took so many other, more harmless life forms down with us.) Some of the bloggers listed here are convinced we're in for it (NTE), while others, to various degrees, are not, and they've been getting pretty tetchy lately about the disagreement, some of them. Hope they make it up soon because really, they're all on the same side and what will be will be. Meanwhile, we do what we can... Theatre of life!

And this just in... In a comment, below, podcaster Alex Smith recommends The Truth about Markets a podcast from London. They "talk about big banks, large scale financial fraud, the way we are all taken in." I'll definitely be checking that out - can't get enough of the real financial story.

Well, that's it for now... there are several other podcasters and bloggers I've enjoyed as well, especially lately when I've been laid up, and had time to listen to so many of them, but these seem to be my current favorites.

What are you listening to?

*************************************

UPDATE March 2015: forthcoming!

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Occupied Cascadia



 http://cascadiamatters.org/2012/occupied-cascadia

We all have our regional focus. Driving across the country on my way back west in about 2005, two things really made an impression on me that still stick:

1. Soon after I got to Oregon, someone from another country asked me what I thought about the US after just having driven across most of it. My answer was immediate: "It's too big." All the way across I'd kept thinking, this country is made up of several different countries, each a region that ought rightly to be organizing itself. No wonder nothing works. These regions are overwritten by a false political economy. How can it sustain itself?

2. In Nebraska, there was a rest stop where a great variety of native prairie plants had been established in an attempt to restore a part of the original ecosystem. It was overwhelming to breathe the air there. It was like being in heaven. I felt invigorated and twice the human I'd been before. This was our world, before the Europeans arrived. This was the great prairie as it was meant to be, as the Native Americans knew it, and it was medicine just to be there. This was the part of the planet my ancestors crossed in their covered wagons in the route I now repeated in my petroleum-powered haste. Did they have any idea how wonderful the world was then? Certainly, they chose to make this journey west, just as I did. In that park, I felt more connected with those ancestors than I've ever felt before or since, just from knowing they'd been here and breathed this same plant air.

Coming back to Cascadia (after an adulthood of wage slavery just to be free, for a while, in the region where I formed my first and deepest connections with Earth), it was wonderful to be here again. And this is where I am now:  occupying Cascadia. I truly love my home.

Cascadia Monthlyhttp://www.cascadianow.org/the-cascadia-monthly-july-edition-of-our-newsletter-released/

More related posts.... from this blog
http://mypersonalblogccm.blogspot.com/2012/08/phase-shift-musings-on-end-of.html
and from another blog I wrote upon the request of another community for a while, before moving here where I can tend my own garden...
http://planetarycitizensmm.blogspot.com/p/brian-swimme-interviews.html

Add Occupied Cascadia to Brian Swimme's Powers of the Universe, Michael Ruppert's Collapse and Timothy S. Bennett's What a Way to Go: Life at the End of Empire...
http://cascadiamatters.org/2012/occupied-cascadia and you pretty much have it all.

Still, a little more from this blog... http://mypersonalblogccm.blogspot.com/p/resilience-food-open-source-technology.html
http://mypersonalblogccm.blogspot.com/2012/04/remarkable-trees-of-world-butterfly-and.html